‎’This gorgeous time-lapse by filmmaker Jamie Scott starts off like any other video capturing the change of the seasons with the movement of the sun, but then around :30 something pretty remarkable happens. To create the effect Scott filmed in 15 locations around New York City’s Central Park, two times a week, for six months using the exact same tripod and camera lens settings resulting in the footage you see here.’ via Colossal

From 2003 to 2005, Photographer Thomas Holton studied the Lam family on Ludlow Street in Manhattan. He was struck by how much life they fit inside their 350-square-foot apartment.
In this photograph, Shirley Lam prepared dinner while her children - Michael, Franklin and Cindy - bathed in the main room of their two-room apartment on Ludlow Street in Manhattan.

From 2003 to 2005, Photographer Thomas Holton studied the Lam family on Ludlow Street in Manhattan. He was struck by how much life they fit inside their 350-square-foot apartment.

In this photograph, Shirley Lam prepared dinner while her children - Michael, Franklin and Cindy - bathed in the main room of their two-room apartment on Ludlow Street in Manhattan.

This worthwhile third edition of Magnum photographer Bruce Davidson’s classic series of images of New York City subway riders - including 25 never-before-published photos - feels as artistically fresh as it did when first released in 1986. By thoroughly delving into a specific time and place, Davidson (East 100th Street and Brooklyn Gangs) achieves intimacy and depth. He captures riders from all walks of life on the graffiti-covered elevated platforms, underground stations, and subway cars of a transportation system that would be almost unrecognizable to current riders.  As rapper Fab 5 Freddy explains in his introductory essay, early ‘80s New York City was an era of economic strain, tenuous race relations, pervasive fear of crime, and Bernard Goetz’s vigilante justice. At the same time, the city saw the explosive birth of major movements in street art including hip hop, break dance, and graffiti.
Read the full review
(from our ongoing dive into book reviews)

This worthwhile third edition of Magnum photographer Bruce Davidson’s classic series of images of New York City subway riders - including 25 never-before-published photos - feels as artistically fresh as it did when first released in 1986. By thoroughly delving into a specific time and place, Davidson (East 100th Street and Brooklyn Gangs) achieves intimacy and depth. He captures riders from all walks of life on the graffiti-covered elevated platforms, underground stations, and subway cars of a transportation system that would be almost unrecognizable to current riders.  As rapper Fab 5 Freddy explains in his introductory essay, early ‘80s New York City was an era of economic strain, tenuous race relations, pervasive fear of crime, and Bernard Goetz’s vigilante justice. At the same time, the city saw the explosive birth of major movements in street art including hip hop, break dance, and graffiti.

Read the full review

(from our ongoing dive into book reviews)