With summer finals out of the way, 17-year-old photographer Ian Komac has devoted his newfound free time to a photo project. Called 60 Days of Summer, the Belgian teen’s manipulated photos give landscapes and everyday objects a whimsical twist. He’s 20 days in, and My Modern Metropolis has published a selection of his work in the project so far. 

With summer finals out of the way, 17-year-old photographer Ian Komac has devoted his newfound free time to a photo project. Called 60 Days of Summer, the Belgian teen’s manipulated photos give landscapes and everyday objects a whimsical twist. He’s 20 days in, and My Modern Metropolis has published a selection of his work in the project so far. 

New mid-range, enthusiast-focused APS-C DSLR from Nikon is here - the D7100. There is also a cool new radio remote control- The WR-1 that lets you remotely control multiple cameras capturing stills and videos, even time-lapse sequences.

The D7100 promises high resolution by making do without an optical low-pass filter in front of its 24MP CMOS sensor. It gains a more sophisticated 51-point autofocus system and a 7fps 1.3x cropped shooting mode that provides a 2x crop compared to a 35mm system. The D7100 has a recommended price of $1,599/£1,299/€1,399 with 18-105mm F3.5-5.6 VR lens.

We have preview with more info of Nikon’s flagship DX model

An iconic photograph, which features Jazz icons including Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, Count Basie, Charles Mingus, and Mary Lou Williams. 
explore-blog:

One August morning in 1958, photographer Art Kane decided to ask every notable jazz musician in New York City to show up in Harlem for a photo shoot at 10am. Despite the challenge of getting jazz musicians to show up anywhere at 10am, 57 musicians showed up.
Complement with William Gottlieb’s timeless portraits of jazz legends, Herman Leonard’s rare photographs,  and the fantastic Jazz Loft Project. 

An iconic photograph, which features Jazz icons including Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, Count Basie, Charles Mingus, and Mary Lou Williams. 

explore-blog:

One August morning in 1958, photographer Art Kane decided to ask every notable jazz musician in New York City to show up in Harlem for a photo shoot at 10am. Despite the challenge of getting jazz musicians to show up anywhere at 10am, 57 musicians showed up.

Complement with William Gottlieb’s timeless portraits of jazz legends, Herman Leonard’s rare photographs,  and the fantastic Jazz Loft Project

(via explore-blog)

'Mental Picture' by Wolfgang Tillmans is part of 'The Unphotographable' exhibition at the Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco that explores ‘a parallel history in which photographers and other artists have attempted to describe by photographic means that which is not so readily seen: thought, time, ghosts, god, dreams.’
Check this link for more information about the exhibition

'Mental Picture' by Wolfgang Tillmans is part of 'The Unphotographable' exhibition at the Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco that explores ‘a parallel history in which photographers and other artists have attempted to describe by photographic means that which is not so readily seen: thought, time, ghosts, god, dreams.’

Check this link for more information about the exhibition

'UK-based photographer Steve Adams has a great skill for calling attention to very simple, everyday details within the natural world. In this series of work, he captures the mystifying elegance of a full moon as it rises against the surface of the Earth or hangs up high, a tiny circle in the sky.’ Read more at My Modern Met

'UK-based photographer Steve Adams has a great skill for calling attention to very simple, everyday details within the natural world. In this series of work, he captures the mystifying elegance of a full moon as it rises against the surface of the Earth or hangs up high, a tiny circle in the sky.’ Read more at My Modern Met

The NY Post ran a cover story and photo this morning about a man (Ki Suk Han) being pushed onto a NY subway track, and then being struck by a train, killing him. The photographer, working for the NY Post, claims he was unable to help the man, but the photo he took moments before the man’s death, has sparked a heated debate about the events that took place, and whether he could have done more.
From the Post article:
“Post freelance photographer R. Umar Abbasi — who had been waiting on the platform of the 49th Street station — ran toward the train, repeatedly firing off his flash to warn the operator.”
“I just started running, running, hoping that the driver could see my flash,” said Abbasi, whose camera captured chilling shots of Suk’s tragic fight for his life.”

The NY Post ran a cover story and photo this morning about a man (Ki Suk Han) being pushed onto a NY subway track, and then being struck by a train, killing him. The photographer, working for the NY Post, claims he was unable to help the man, but the photo he took moments before the man’s death, has sparked a heated debate about the events that took place, and whether he could have done more.

From the Post article:

Post freelance photographer R. Umar Abbasi — who had been waiting on the platform of the 49th Street station — ran toward the train, repeatedly firing off his flash to warn the operator.”

“I just started running, running, hoping that the driver could see my flash,” said Abbasi, whose camera captured chilling shots of Suk’s tragic fight for his life.”