The NY Post ran a cover story and photo this morning about a man (Ki Suk Han) being pushed onto a NY subway track, and then being struck by a train, killing him. The photographer, working for the NY Post, claims he was unable to help the man, but the photo he took moments before the man’s death, has sparked a heated debate about the events that took place, and whether he could have done more.
From the Post article:
“Post freelance photographer R. Umar Abbasi — who had been waiting on the platform of the 49th Street station — ran toward the train, repeatedly firing off his flash to warn the operator.”
“I just started running, running, hoping that the driver could see my flash,” said Abbasi, whose camera captured chilling shots of Suk’s tragic fight for his life.”

The NY Post ran a cover story and photo this morning about a man (Ki Suk Han) being pushed onto a NY subway track, and then being struck by a train, killing him. The photographer, working for the NY Post, claims he was unable to help the man, but the photo he took moments before the man’s death, has sparked a heated debate about the events that took place, and whether he could have done more.

From the Post article:

Post freelance photographer R. Umar Abbasi — who had been waiting on the platform of the 49th Street station — ran toward the train, repeatedly firing off his flash to warn the operator.”

“I just started running, running, hoping that the driver could see my flash,” said Abbasi, whose camera captured chilling shots of Suk’s tragic fight for his life.”

This worthwhile third edition of Magnum photographer Bruce Davidson’s classic series of images of New York City subway riders - including 25 never-before-published photos - feels as artistically fresh as it did when first released in 1986. By thoroughly delving into a specific time and place, Davidson (East 100th Street and Brooklyn Gangs) achieves intimacy and depth. He captures riders from all walks of life on the graffiti-covered elevated platforms, underground stations, and subway cars of a transportation system that would be almost unrecognizable to current riders.  As rapper Fab 5 Freddy explains in his introductory essay, early ‘80s New York City was an era of economic strain, tenuous race relations, pervasive fear of crime, and Bernard Goetz’s vigilante justice. At the same time, the city saw the explosive birth of major movements in street art including hip hop, break dance, and graffiti.
Read the full review
(from our ongoing dive into book reviews)

This worthwhile third edition of Magnum photographer Bruce Davidson’s classic series of images of New York City subway riders - including 25 never-before-published photos - feels as artistically fresh as it did when first released in 1986. By thoroughly delving into a specific time and place, Davidson (East 100th Street and Brooklyn Gangs) achieves intimacy and depth. He captures riders from all walks of life on the graffiti-covered elevated platforms, underground stations, and subway cars of a transportation system that would be almost unrecognizable to current riders.  As rapper Fab 5 Freddy explains in his introductory essay, early ‘80s New York City was an era of economic strain, tenuous race relations, pervasive fear of crime, and Bernard Goetz’s vigilante justice. At the same time, the city saw the explosive birth of major movements in street art including hip hop, break dance, and graffiti.

Read the full review

(from our ongoing dive into book reviews)