The Leica M-Monochrom is a black-and-white version of its M9 full-frame rangefinder. In most other respects, the M-Monochrom shares its hardware with the M9. It can add three toning colors to its monchrome output or its uncompressed DNG files can be edited using the included copy of Photoshop Lightroom. A full version of the mono processing software Silver Efex 2 is also included. It will cost around $7,950
We’ve prepared a hands-on preview of the camera. Check it out here

The Leica M-Monochrom is a black-and-white version of its M9 full-frame rangefinder. In most other respects, the M-Monochrom shares its hardware with the M9. It can add three toning colors to its monchrome output or its uncompressed DNG files can be edited using the included copy of Photoshop Lightroom. A full version of the mono processing software Silver Efex 2 is also included. It will cost around $7,950

We’ve prepared a hands-on preview of the camera. Check it out here

Our preview of the Pentax K-01 mirrorless camera.
The camera’s rather interesting design is the work of respected product designer Marc Newson and features a logo of his signature on the base of the camera. The K-01 costs around $749 body-only and $899 with the ‘XS’ version of the 40mm lens.
It combines the 16MP CMOS sensor from the K-5 DSLR with a full Pentax K lens mount, to create a mirrorless camera with an enviable range of lenses already available.

Our preview of the Pentax K-01 mirrorless camera.

The camera’s rather interesting design is the work of respected product designer Marc Newson and features a logo of his signature on the base of the camera. The K-01 costs around $749 body-only and $899 with the ‘XS’ version of the 40mm lens.

It combines the 16MP CMOS sensor from the K-5 DSLR with a full Pentax K lens mount, to create a mirrorless camera with an enviable range of lenses already available.

Our review and video of the Lytro Light field camera
There was a lot of excitement when the New York Times wrote about a small company promising to make focus errors a thing of the past. A camera that allowed you to focus after you take the picture. Its subject was Lytro, a startup promising to make its technology available in a consumer product on the market within a year. And, sure enough, here is the Lytro Light Field Camera.
The company has shipped its first Light Field Camera to a customer and we’ve had a chance to spend some time with one, to see what their experience is likely to be like. It’s a totally unconventional camera that captures images that can be refocused after they’re shot, so we haven’t shot our usual, 2D test charts but we’ve tried to sum-up its technology and what it’s like to shoot with. Read our review to find out what we thought

Our review and video of the Lytro Light field camera

There was a lot of excitement when the New York Times wrote about a small company promising to make focus errors a thing of the past. A camera that allowed you to focus after you take the picture. Its subject was Lytro, a startup promising to make its technology available in a consumer product on the market within a year. And, sure enough, here is the Lytro Light Field Camera.

The company has shipped its first Light Field Camera to a customer and we’ve had a chance to spend some time with one, to see what their experience is likely to be like. It’s a totally unconventional camera that captures images that can be refocused after they’re shot, so we haven’t shot our usual, 2D test charts but we’ve tried to sum-up its technology and what it’s like to shoot with. Read our review to find out what we thought